Announcing: The VIFAA Accelerator

February 16, 2022 Agriculture Vinisha Bhatia-Murdach
News/Events, Program

Since 2017, Development Gateway has been working on the Visualizing Insights on Fertilizer for African Agriculture (VIFAA) Program with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and implemented in partnership with the International Fertilizer Development Center’s AfricaFertilizer.org program. The goal of the program is to support development partners and the private sector to respond efficiently and effectively to changes in the fertilizer market, ensuring that sufficient quantities and appropriate fertilizers reach farmers at the right time for planting. In order to reach this goal, VIFAA fills key fertilizer information gaps, increases data-driven policy and investment decisions in the fertilizer sector, and develops comprehensive, user-centered fertilizer data dashboards.

In late 2021, building on the successes around closing the data gaps and making the fertilizer data more accessible through dashboards, VIFAA received funding to expand the program to include four to six additional countries through 2023. We are calling this new phase the VIFAA Accelerator. The Accelerator came at an appropriate time as global fertilizer prices have had a significant impact on African markets’ that are highly vulnerable to the increase in agriculture input costs. In addition, the African Union Commission is planning to host the Africa Fertilizer and Soil Health Summit in 2023 where data-driven solutions will be instrumental in the development of a 10 year Fertilizer and Soil Health Action Plan for the continent.

Nigeria Urea Market Trends

Through the VIFAA program, we have developed fertilizer dashboards to support farmers in Kenya, Ghana, and Nigeria – in addition to the COVID-19 Africa Fertilizer Watch Dashboard. We are still in the process of refining the next phase of VIFAA countries. The prioritization process will review data availability and country stakeholder interest, among other considerations.

VIFAA Ghana Dashboard

VIFAA Kenya Dashboard

VIFAA Nigeria Dashboard

Highlights from VIFAA's First 4 Years

National Average Fertilizer Consumption - by Nutrient Ton
Understanding Fertilizer Data

Finding reliable agriculture data in sub-Saharan Africa is often difficult. If available at all, data is usually fragmented and tucked away in silos within government ministries or closely held by private companies. It is also significantly delayed or in a format that makes analysis difficult. For stakeholders who need information for decision making, a lack of reliable data is a significant barrier. The Visualizing Insights on Fertilizer for African Agriculture (VIFAA) program is working towards making fertilizer-related data, a key subset of agriculture data, more accessible to stakeholders for decision making.

August 19, 2020 Agriculture
Apparent Fertilizer Consumption
Sourcing Fertilizer Data in Sub-Saharan Africa

In advance of the first VIFAA country dashboard launch next week, we will explore the importance and source of accurate and reliable data for each of the indicators. This is a crucial step in making data available in a way that stakeholders can use to inform their decisions. 

August 28, 2020 Agriculture
COVID-19 VIFAA Dashboard
Measuring COVID-19’s Impact on the Fertilizer Sector in Sub-Saharan Africa

The COVID-19 Africa Fertilizer Watch Dashboard, covering 28 countries across sub-Saharan Africa was launched today. This dashboard uses 11 indicators to track COVID-19 country-specific mitigation measures on the delivery & use of fertilizers to identify impacts on productivity & food security across the continent. The goal of this dashboard is to support efficient and effective responses to the evolving global health emergency, and ensure that sufficient and appropriate fertilizers reach farmers. 

August 5, 2020 Agriculture

VIFAA Impact Stories

September 10, 2020 Agriculture
Gideon Negedu
From Rumors to Evidence-Based Advocacy

Mr. Gideon Negedu, the Executive Secretary of The Fertilizer Producers & Suppliers Association of Nigeria (FEPSAN,) describes using rumors for planning and the importance of the VIFAA Nigeria Dashboard in evidence-based advocacy.

September 7, 2021  
November 3, 2021 Agriculture
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Cropland Under Production

Decision-Making: from Soil to Farmers

September 2, 2021 Agriculture
Lindsey Fincham, Seember Ali, Beverley Hatcher-Mbu
Program

Through the Visualizing Insights on Fertilizer for African Agriculture (VIFAA) Program, Development Gateway – and partners International Fertilizer Development Center (IFDC) and AfricaFertlizer.org – aim to fill key fertilizer information gaps, increase data-driven policy and investment decisions in the fertilizer sector, and develop comprehensive, user-centered fertilizer data dashboards. The goal is to support development partners and the private sector to respond efficiently and effectively to changes in the fertilizer market, ensuring that sufficient quantities and appropriate fertilizers reach farmers at the right time for planting.

Crop Yields and Food Security

Professor Victor Chude

There are 17 nutrients required for plant growth with (N) nitrogen, (P) phosphorus, and (K) potassium serving as the essential trio. In Nigeria, there is a drive to produce and use more region and crop-specific fertilizers in an effort to increase crop yields and food security. Professor Victor Okechukwu Chude is the Registrar/CEO of Nigeria Institute of Soil Science (NISS), where his work centers on these issues. His passion for agriculture is derived from working with his grandfather on the family’s farm; and has been driven by the desire to produce food for his family and for the rest of Nigeria. In his role, Professor Chude focuses on soil fertility, plant nutrition, and promoting the sustainable management of Nigerian soils. NISS sees soil science as a way to ensure environmental sustainability, high agricultural productivity, and food security in the country.

Unreliable Data

Professor Chude explained that sourcing data in Nigeria can be a herculean task. He often relies on data derived from student works and research, FAO Stats, and internet research. “It’s tough… students know that their degree is dependant on reliable data, but some of the data that is out there is not reliable.”

For Professor Chude, another consideration is producing data and analysis that can be understood by the end-users, often agricultural extension agents or farmers. Using raw data can be a challenge, specifically when working with constituents with lower data literacy. “Data sometimes looks so complicated, you wonder where to start and how [to] figure it out.” 

Integrating Visuals and Analysis

The VIFAA Nigeria Dashboard was co-designed by Development Gateway and AfricaFertilizer.org (a project of IFDC),  in conjunction with stakeholders like Professor Chude and NISS. Built on trusted data validated by Nigeria’s Fertilizer Working Group, the dashboard displays fourteen indicators including apparent consumption, price, availability, and a searchable plant directory. Additionally, this information has been overlaid on the cropland under production map, which is the first cropland mapping in Nigeria since 1973. 

In encouraging farmers to use fertilizer, Professor Chude described the need for information on the prices of various products, fertilizer use, fertilizer availability, and crop-specific fertilizers. This information feeds into decision-making at NISS and at the regional or individual levels.

Transforming Decision-Making

Professor Chude describes the dashboard in terms of improvement to efficiency. First, because much of the analysis has already been done and is being visualized on the dashboard, which saves significant staff time and reduces calculation errors. It also improves the ease of doing business through increased knowledge. The dashboard also reduces barriers to collaboration for partners by increasing the compatibility of the data. 

He also sees the benefit to farmers questioning which products to use. The dashboard is highly visual. It shows the value of fertilizer and how it can impact a farmer’s income. Extension agents, who are already trusted by the farmers, can explain the benefits and leave easy-to-understand data visualizations with the farmers, which can “become very impactful.”

Overall, Professor Chude sees the value in the way data has been transformed on the dashboard. It increases his ability to make decisions and scale specific projects. “This [dashboard] is highly commendable. It is easy to use and contains a lot of useful and helpful data. it will enhance our work as soil scientists and extension agents in making recommendations.”

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Improving Land and Crop Use Data in Nigeria – The VIFAA Innovation Fund

Our Visualizing Insights for Fertilizer in African Agriculture (VIFAA) Program launched an Innovation Fund to address data shortages relating to total crop production. Building on its track record of mapping land cover, Quantitative Engineering Design (QED) was selected to tackle the challenge of mapping Nigeria’s croplands. Through the Innovation Fund, DG and partners will use the resulting data and maps to answer two questions: (a) what is the total cropland under production in Nigeria and (b) what is the cropland under production by crop type.

September 14, 2022 Agriculture
Photo by Markus Winkler via Unsplash
Nigeria’s Changing Fertilizer Sector

In the past decade, there has been over $7 billion worth of private-sector investments into Nigeria’s agriculture sector. Why, and what is the impact of these investments? What does it mean for Nigerian farmers? In this blog, we explore these and other changes happening in the Nigerian fertilizer market.

September 7, 2022 Agriculture
Photo by Maninderjeet Singh Sidhu via Unsplash
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September 6, 2022 Agriculture

Reducing Errors and Speeding Calculation through Automation

May 26, 2021 DCDJ, Health
Lindsey Fincham
Program

Armel Cyrille Brou, DCDJ Fellow in Côte d’Ivoire, provided support to the data management team at CMS Private Center Plus, an Ivorian health facility focused on treating patients with HIV/AIDS and STDs. Armel developed an application that reduces the time spent calculating patient program schedules from five minutes to less than 30 seconds.

Background

The Des Chiffres et Des Jeunes (DCDJ) Data Fellowship is a flagship DCDJ program that places technically-trained Ivorian youth into organizations where they encourage and increase the degree to which data is used for decision making. It is a unique opportunity for young people to sharpen data skills while contributing to a strengthened data ecosystem and to data-related resource availability in Côte d’Ivoire. DCDJ is led by Development Gateway and funded by the Data Collaboratives for Local Impact (DCLI) program. The DCDJ Data Fellowship builds young peoples’ skills to strategically catalyze sustainable change, DCDJ leverages local capacity to improve data access, sharing, and availability.

Before joining the DCDJ Fellowship, Armel had been a masters student interested in honing his data science skills and gaining hands-on experience. After the Fellows training, Armel was placed with CMS Private Center Plus.

Problem

While conducting an assessment with the data management team and also the lab, Armel learned that when new patients were admitted, a healthcare worker must calculate the schedule of that patient’s care program. This calculation includes accounting for the patients’ total years of infection and the types of support needed to manage their condition. It is then used to set up a specific appointment, lab test, and medication schedule. Each additional year in treatment adds a layer of complexity to the calculations. For patients with an extended infection history, like those who had been receiving care for 20 years, making the calculation could take over five minutes of busy administrators’ time. Despite being critical to patient care, the information and calculations were also being entered into the system manually, which introduced room for error. It was clear that this calculation was time consuming, and that it could be efficiently automated.

Solution

Armel, with the support of the DCDJ SuperFellows and several other Fellows, worked to create an easy-to-use application that would automatically and accurately calculate the patient program schedules. Built as a simple Excel document, health care providers can enter the date the patient started treatment and the current date, and the application will then calculate all upcoming appointments, lab dates, and needed lab types.

Process

After identifying the calculation problem as a constraint to healthcare administrator productivity, Armel worked with the data management team to support the new tool development process. The team learned the underlying calculations of the program schedule and created Excel functions that would automate them. Then they tested the application with several healthcare providers to confirm its effectiveness. After development, Armel provided staff training to healthcare administrators to ensure the new application was being used effectively. He describes the application as very intuitive and easy to understand and use, so training can be done by existing staff in the future, without having to rely on Armel or other Data Fellows.

Outcomes & Impacts

The application has reduced the number of errors introduced into the patient scheduling process, while also saving the time required for repetitive, manual calculations. Prior to the application, it would take five minutes per program calculation. Now it takes less than 30 seconds. It was clear to Armel that this system was of value to the clinic staff and was being used. When one staff member accidentally deleted the program from the computers at the facility, they quickly called Armel to reinstall it for them. 

More effective scheduling also benefits patients. Prior to the new tool, healthcare providers would often only see the patient when they were in need of a medication refill, and would not know to remind patients of upcoming lab appointments. If patients miss their lab appointments, it is difficult for doctors to make informed decisions about patient care – they may be missing data on viral load, viral suppression, and medication. With the automatic calculations, patients and providers both have a much clearer understanding of expectations prior to appointments, and patients benefit from a more comprehensive continuum of care.

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Across Abidjan, health facilities have varying levels of technical capacity, data infrastructure, and management practices to access patient health data. Through the DCDJ program, Fellow determined that a national health site performance dashboard would bring critical information together to better manage appointments, treatment plans, and patient information.

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April 8, 2021 DCDJ, Health
Lindsey Fincham
Program

Linda Sanogo, a DCDJ Fellow in Côte d’Ivoire, worked with a community health facility to develop and train staff on a new database, as well as complete training on other IT systems. Because of Linda’s support, the facility has reduced the number of hours spent managing patient records, and opened up more time to ensure high-quality care. 

Background

The Des Chiffres et Des Jeunes (DCDJ) Data Fellowship is a flagship DCDJ program that places technically-trained Ivorian youth into organizations where they encourage and increase the degree to which data is used for decision making. It is a unique opportunity for young people to sharpen data skills while contributing to a strengthened data ecosystem and to data-related resource availability in Côte d’Ivoire. DCDJ is led by Development Gateway and funded by the Data Collaboratives for Local Impact (DCLI) program. The DCDJ Data Fellowship builds young peoples’ skills to strategically catalyze sustainable change, DCDJ leverages local capacity to improve data access, sharing, and availability.

Prior to becoming a fellow, Linda was in an IT training program. She was particularly interested in learning more about how data science could be used in her daily and professional life. 

Problem

After the intensive DCDJ Data Fellowship training, Linda’s internship placement was at a community health facility in Port-Bouet Gonzaqueville.  She noticed that the health facility was generally well run, but that there were opportunities to improve maintenance of proper patient records. Two issues converged to result in poor quality data:

  1. The facility had 1024 active patient records, with 25 to 60 new patients – and patient records – added each month. These records were kept in paper files. Every day, the social workers, counselors, and other staff would need to ask the Data Manager to pull information from the 30 records for the patients they would be seeing. Records were not always easy to locate, and sometimes patients would be told to come back another day once their record was located. In addition, all record updates had to go through the Data Manager, which could take several extra days.
  2. The second issue Linda saw was that despite having a computer system at the facility, the counselors and social workers were “afraid to even turn the computers on,” and did not feel that they had enough technical knowledge to use them.

Solution

Linda understood that the social workers and counselors were undertaking a huge amount of work that truly impacts the lives of people in the community. At the same time, the way the health facility was maintaining records was creating additional work. The solution Linda developed was two-fold, first to create an electronic database of patient records that would be easy for staff to use – and that connected to the larger SIGDEP2 system which manages the country’s patient-level HIV data; and second to train the staff to use both the new database and SIGDEP2.

Screenshots from the SIGDEP2 system with dummy data that Linda used to train staff
Screenshots from the SIGDEP2 system with dummy data that Linda used to train staff
Screenshots from the SIGDEP2 system with dummy data that Linda used to train staff
Screenshots from the SIGDEP2 system with dummy data that Linda used to train staff

Process

In training staff that had such little experience using computers, Linda started with the basics – how to turn the computer on, what types of programs were available, and how to search for information on the internet. She trained four female staff members  (counselors and social workers) in these basic skills. Then, working with the Data Manager at the facility, she developed an Excel database that interfaced with the SIGDEP2 system. Linda continued to expand training for the women to include both the new database and SIGDEP2. There was hesitancy at first as the women did not see how computer skills or the new databases would be useful in their work. However, after some time and guided training strategies, they became comfortable with the systems and saw how easy it was to pull up information on the patients they would be seeing on a given day; for example, they could easily find out if a patient was up to date on his medication or needed a new prescription. With these skills, the women healthcare administrators at the community center could become more confident in their work, boost their efficiency, and grow their careers – contributing to an important increase in women in data science.

Outcomes and Impacts

Four additional staff are now trained and using the new systems. The new systems make the counselors and social workers more autonomous. They are now comfortable searching the database and SIGDEP2 directly for needed information rather than going through the data manager. The time saved by staff goes to ensuring better quality patient care and making sure that patients are supported and do not lose track of their appointments or become marked as “Interruption in Treatment (IIT).”

 Additionally, Linda’s work had an even larger impact on the overall data ecosystem. Now instead of waiting days for physical records, or having to go through the Data Manager, staff can use the available databases to find the information they need. The Data Manager now spends less time pulling records for other staff and can put more time into ensuring quality records and managing the system. With SIGDEP2 and Linda’s database in place, the facility can now see which tasks are most challenging and time-consuming, and can adapt their internal processes to be more efficient.

Conclusion

Linda’s passion for data science has stayed with her after the DCDJ Fellowship. Now she works in a private IT company, where she is using data science to track incident reports. Her new company is realizing that tracking and using the data from incident reports has created a more efficient allocation of technicians – and also has started investing in data science as a result. Of the DCDJ experience, she said, “If it were up to me, all young people would be trained in data science!”

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Digitizing Patient Records for Improved Patient Care

March 18, 2021 DCDJ, Health
Lindsey Fincham
Program

Blanchard Kablam, a DCDJ Fellow in Côte d’Ivoire, developed MyTrack – an app that digitizes the filing system of Houphouët-Boigny General Hospital. Through the app, the hospital reduced the number of hours spent tracking down patient records by 75% – and can see more patients per day, provide better service, and reduce patients categorized as IIT (interruption in treatment). This story was originally posted by Data Collaboratives for Local Impact here.

Background

The Des Chiffres et Des Jeunes (DCDJ) Data Fellowship is a flagship DCDJ program that places technically-trained Ivorian youth into organizations where they encourage and increase the degree to which data is used for decision making. It is a unique opportunity for young people to sharpen data skills while contributing to a strengthened data ecosystem and to data-related resource availability in Côte d’Ivoire. DCDJ is a program led by Development Gateway and funded by the Data Collaboratives for Local Impact (DCLI) program. The DCDJ Data Fellowship builds young peoples’ skills to strategically catalyze sustainable change, DCDJ leverages local capacity to improve data access, sharing, and availability.

Before the DCDJ Fellowship, Blanchard was an IT technician and graduate student in mathematics. He described himself as “obsessed with data science,” and was excited for an opportunity to gain new skills and practical experience. After the Fellows training, Blanchard was placed with an HIV/AIDS care unit at  Houphouet Boigny General Hospital. 

Problem

When Blanchard arrived at the hospital for his placement, patient records were still managed in physical, paper formats. All appointments scheduled for a given day would have their files pulled by staff the day before. The care unit had more than 1,700 active patient files, four staff alone were dedicated to managing the filing system, and a task as simple as finding current patient contact information could take much longer than five minutes. On average, only 20 patients and files could be processed per day. This system was ineffective for both staff and patients. Patients missing appointments could easily go unnoticed, and appointments would run long trying to recapture missing or unrecorded information. Depending on how the patient came into the system or what other hospital services the patient had used, the file may have originated in the emergency department and could change hands several times, making tracking down files a huge undertaking. When files got lost, the information was nearly impossible to recreate. 

Solution

The old filing system was not just a headache, it was also repetitive work – and a waste of precious time. Blanchard knew that any repetitive task could become automated. The hospital had computer systems and was using Excel to track some patient information, but they did not have a true system for patient records. The solution was to digitize patient records into a secure app called MyTrack. This app now houses all patient records in a searchable and database. Staff use the app to track medication, viral load, appointments, contact information, and more. Patients can also log into MyTrack to manage their own healthcare needs.

Training healthcare staff on MyTrack

Processes

MyTrack was built using Python and is available on PC, Android, and iOS. Blanchard worked to develop this app with several other DCDJ Fellows and with support from the DCDJ trainers and mentors. Each component was reviewed by the hospital’s data manager to ensure a seamless fit with existing systems. In addition to the patient care functionalities, Blanchard and the development team are proud of the steps they took to ensure the system is secure – specifically considering the sensitive data held in MyTrack. To access specific patient information in the application, the user will need a password which is issued exclusively by the HIV/AIDS manager. Additionally, the history and activity for MyTrack are kept in a separate application, and can only be accessed internally. Finally, the app has defined user types (by staff levels, patient, and group types) which allows permissions to be adjusted based on specific user requirements.

Outcomes and Impacts

The MyTrack app has now been in place since May of 2020, and the hospital has seen positive impacts. Now that patient files are digitized, the hospital has one instead of four staff members dedicated to managing the filing system, and the HIV/AIDS care unit is now processing an average of thirty more patients and files per day than before MyTrack. Additionally, MyTrack has reduced the number of hours spent tracking down patients and updating their records by 75%. 

Not only has the patient tracking process has become more efficient, but data quality has improved as well. The care unit now has a better understanding of the total number of patients in their care and can distribute the patients more evenly across care providers. Patients get notified in advance of appointments and MyTrack automatically tracks patients missing appointments or lost to follow up. The app also ensures that patient appointments are scheduled to align with prescription refill needs, so patients are not without medication. 

Conclusion

Blanchard is hopeful that MyTrack will eventually connect with systems like SIGDEP2 or other health databases at the regional or country level. For now, it is supporting decision-making at the hospital level. The management team is using MyTrack to understand patient flows, healthcare gaps, and staffing needs. Recently, for example, adjusting the number of community counselors available to provide care. 

DCDJ has changed the way Blanchard thinks about data. Before the Fellowship, he had a blurry vision of what data science looked like in practice, and how it could benefit daily life. Now he  sees it as his calling and is pursuing a career in the data science field. 

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The State of Data in Open Contracting

February 2, 2021 Open Contracting and Procurement Analytics
Taryn Davis
Open Data, Program

This past year has highlighted the global importance of public procurement. We witnessed the vulnerabilities involved as governments raced to procure PPE, ventilators, and other necessary resources at the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, and now procurement of vaccines. Stories of corruption and those taking advantage of the chaos have emerged, highlighting why open contracting data is more critical than ever. So where does open contracting (OC) data currently stand? Frankly, it still has quite a way to go, but the examples are promising.

What data exists?

Starting in 2019, DG worked with Transparency International to bring together procurement data from six different countries. We transformed the data for those countries that weren’t already into OCDS format and visualized the data on a series of charts based on our OC M&E and Corruption Risk Dashboard charts. What we learned as we began this process, was that all six countries were publishing very little data in common. In fact, the only data consistently published by all six countries was if the tenders were open/competitive, direct, selective, or limited procurement, which helps show how competitive their procurement processes are. A majority of the countries also published the name of the supplier that won the contract. There is much more volatility regarding what other data points countries choose to publish. For example, some publish estimated tender prices, some publish the actual awarded amount, some publish both. 

What data is still needed?

Knowing how long a tender is open for submission can be helpful as short tender periods can indicate collusion; however, this requires data on not just the tender close date, but tender start date – when it first became open. It is less common to publish this date. 

 Information on specific item costs are much less likely to be published (though some still are!) Through the almost twenty open contracting assessments that we have conducted, we have heard that government entities struggle to know what a reasonable price is for certain items and projects. Price lists are often outdated, and estimates often turn out wrong. In one case, a government consulted local companies for prices. When the bids they received were far lower than what they originally heard, they canceled the tender from concern over the disparities in the estimates. Publishing data on the final contract or award costs for specific items would help other departments have a better idea of what an expected budget might be. To do this, governments must publish the specific items, unit, and item cost for their contracts. This necessitates having a single list of items and units that is shared. From our experience we have learned that while item lists might be relatively common, standard units might need to be put in place, as the unit makes a big impact on how much is actually spent per item. For example, in some cases “each” is used for most items rather than specifying the number of  liters of petrol purchased or total km of road being built. Improved specificity ensures we are comparing the same cost per item. In Elgeyo County, Kenya, the government is interested in this data being used to alert officials if items are purchased for more than the recommended price. Data on items also allows other key analysis, such as if the government is procuring for the same items across departments, and if bulk purchasing could reduce costs. It could also help track:

  •  if the same company is supplying all resources for specific items
  • if certain items are not procured through open procurement, but should be; 
  • if there are consistent challenges with implementation for certain items. 

This data can be more tedious to report. Even if it is already created as  part of a contract, it is typically not available in machine readable form. Reporting this data in machine-readable formats from the start can reduce the effort to publish them.

Implementation data is another data point that is often asked for by government, civil society, media, and other stakeholders; however, it is much more rarely published. Implementation data can include if a project was completed, if it was completed on-time or delayed, and if certain suppliers consistently fail to deliver or are behind schedule – which can help get delayed projects back on track. In Makueni County, Kenya, for example, we saw a  local organization URAIA use the data to identify 34 delayed projects. They then shared this information with the county government, which prompted officials to investigate and address some of the problematic projects. Implementation data can also be a resource for government procurement teams to know if certain suppliers are less reliable. We hope to increase use cases like these through the addition of low-tech solutions. For example, DG developed an SMS feature for Makueni County that sends implementation updates to public subscribers and collects feedback. 

Implementation data can be more difficult to publish as it typically requires getting information from different team members – such as Monitoring and Evaluations teams – rather than just from the procurement team. Solutions might need to be adapted to meet different team members’ needs. For example, we developed an offline, mobile data collection tool for Project Management Committee members to report to, since they were more dispersed throughout the county and had more connectivity issues. Meanwhile, government officers enter data at their office computers, with more consistent connectivity, making an online web portal more suitable. All teams should be engaged in publishing processes to see how to streamline procurement, and see how publishing additional data can benefit their needs as well.

In addition to the benefits outlined here, an overall benefit is a general trust that can be built through transparency. We have heard from many government agencies the challenges that come from citizens and companies questioning how procurement decisions are made, and the scandals that are unearthed by the media. When a story gets splashed in the media, the whole government can get dragged down, but with open procurement systems, like DG’s Open Contracting Portal, which includes the corruption risk dashboard, the government can identify and address corruption quickly. Overall, open contracting can strengthen trust by showing when processes are working correctly and being followed well. 

General Challenges

While the OCDS standard has championed the need for common identifiers – IDs that are used to identify a specific organization or item – many countries still do not use common IDs. Standardized identifiers make it possible to ensure that the same organization, such as a supplier, buyer, or item, are consistently referenced across different tenders and contracts. These identifiers enable holistic analysis and often need to be created in order for open contracting to be implemented.

One of the most common challenges to publishing procurement data is the effort needed to put the data into a machine-readable format. Ideally, online systems would create streamlined processes where forms are entered and managed within the same system that publishes the data. Where possible, in Makueni County, online forms have started to replace manual forms. However, specific physical forms are often still legally required within procurement processes. Moving the creation of these forms to a solely digital format means a legal reform. As a result, some agencies take on the task of managing both a manual and online process; however, the benefits of making data transparent and the analytics and learnings several governments have been able to gain from this work has been worth it. 

What is disheartening is when governments go through the effort to collect data, and in some cases may publish the data on web pages, but do not make the data available in any easily reusable format, such as Kenya’s PPIP and South Africa’s eTenderPublication. This means that agencies cannot easily access their data, and it is more challenging to analyze the data through charts and graphs. In particular, South Africa’s site is loosely structured since it is a simple HTML page that allows various data formats, spellings, and placement of the information, which makes the data especially difficult to reuse. 

What’s Next?

We have been working to make our Open Contracting Portal, first launched in Makueni County, more flexible and customizable in order to scale to additional counties across Kenya, and hopefully to other countries as well. Additional counties and countries are starting to realize the benefits of open contracting — being able to use their own data for better decision making, building trust, and engaging more with communities they serve. We will continue to work with Makueni County and other government entities to create systems that can eventually replace manual processes, making open contracting the default, rather than the afterthought.

 

Photo by Joecalih via Unsplash

Murielle Ettiene, DCDJ Data Fellow

Increasing Data Quality at the Clinic to National Level in Côte d’Ivoire

January 19, 2021 DCDJ
Lindsey Fincham
Program

Murielle Ettiene, a DCDJ Data Fellow was placed with the National AIDS Control Program, where she improved data quality through clinic-level trainings.

Background

The National AIDS Control Program (Plan National de la Lutte Contre le SIDA/VIH, PNLS) coordinates the national response to the HIV/AIDS crisis in Côte d’Ivoire. PNLS is responsible for collecting and reporting logistical and clinical data from 33 regions and 113 districts, as well as creating and executing the National Strategic Plan (Plan National du VIH/SIDA, PNS) to fight HIV/AIDS, which is the national roadmap for the next five years of Côte d’Ivoire’s epidemic response.

Des Chiffres et Des Jeunes (DCDJ) aims to bolster the subnational supply and usage of data for citizens of Côte d’Ivoire, engage youth as champions of these services, and fuel innovation to address rising data and information needs. Through the DCDJ Fellowship Program, Ivorians between 18 and 34 years old spend two months in intensive data science and analytics training. Following the training, Fellows are placed in internships to support their hosting organizations in making data-informed decisions. DCDJ (Des Chiffres et Des Jeunes) is a project of the Data Collaboratives for Local Impact (DCLI) program, a partnership between PEPFAR and the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) that aims to increase expertise and resource availability in Côte d’Ivoire.

Before applying to become a DCDJ Data Fellow, Murielle Ettiene had earned a BA in Economics and Statistics and was preparing to start a Master’s Degree in Finance and Banking. She already had experience working in a financial institution, and hoped that the program would help her towards a career as a Financial Analyst. After being accepted into the program and completed her training, Murielle was placed at PNLS. She worked with both the Monitoring and Evaluation Unit and the Care and Treatment Department.

Problem

While working in both departments, Murielle saw data quality to be the biggest challenge, specifically in evaluating the systematic care of HIV/AIDS patients. She realized that the mistakes came from detail processing at the facility level where doctors, social workers, and other clinic staff record data. After investigating and visiting the clinics, Murielle understood that the real problem was a lack of training. 

Solution

To support better data quality and more effective data use for decision-making, Murielle developed a training for staff in her department at PNLS, focused on using Excel and PowerPoint. After the initial training at PNLS, she set her sites on the deeper problem – poor quality data coming from the HIV/AIDS clinics and care sites. After completing the DCDJ Fellowship, she continued working with PNLS as a volunteer. It was at this point that Murielle started working directly with the clinics and care sites, providing similar training with a focus on data quality. 

Outcomes and Impact

The data collected by each clinic is reported to PNLS, who uses it to inform budgets, programs, and long term planning. With Murielle’s help, 10 individuals were trained in computer literacy and data quality at PNLS. Additionally, she contributed to the evaluation of the quality of services in 13 health centers for the management of HIV/AIDS, and to the Data Quality Assessment and subsequent training at 12 sites at the national and sub-national levels.

Ultimately, the training resulted in a higher quality of data coming from the clinics and a better quality control system at PNLS. Now, people who were not previously involved in data processing and data management – due to a previous lack of training – can contribute to the process. With data quality control managed closer to data reporting, identifying and cleaning errors takes less time, which means that processing at the national level is a smoother process.

Murielle was most focused on data related to systematic care. Systematic care data collected by PNLS is used to understand how and where interventions are working, and provides the evidence needed to update or change policies where interventions are not working.

Conclusion

Murielle was in a unique position as a Fellow at PNLS. Because her role was to evaluate and improve the data ecosystem, she had the flexibility to provide facility-level training. After seeing changes in data quality at the facility level, Murielle said, “If the data at the bottom of the ladder is broken, it will impact the results at the top” adding the insight about her work, “through each line of data, you see the lives of the people you are impacting.”

Also, because women in data science are somewhat rare in Cote d’Ivoire, Murielle had not originally considered a career in this field. The Fellowship opened her eyes to that potential, especially a career in monitoring & evaluation.

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Reducing Errors and Speeding Calculation through Automation

Armel Cyrille Brou, DCDJ Fellow in Côte d’Ivoire, provided support to the data management team at an Ivorian health facility focused on treating patients with HIV/AIDS. Armel developed an application that reduces the time spent calculating patient program schedules from five minutes to less than 30 seconds.

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Improving the National Ministry of Education’s Information Management System

DCDJ Data Fellows assigned to work with the National Ministry of Education in Côte d'Ivoire proposed new methods of data collection based on data collection officers’ needs. They introduced Tableau as a new way of visualizing data and creating dashboards, and conducted in-person introductory training sessions of the tools – working with partners to ensure they understood the benefits of the tool and can use them independently. 

April 16, 2021 DCDJ, Health
Empowering Counselors and Social Workers with Rapid Access to Patient Information

Linda Sanogo, a DCDJ Fellow in Côte d’Ivoire, worked with a community health facility to develop and train staff on a new database, as well as complete training on other IT systems. Because of Linda’s support, the facility has reduced the number of hours spent managing patient records, and opened up more time to ensure high-quality care. 

April 8, 2021 DCDJ, Health

Du côté de l’Afrique Francophone et des Caraïbes

January 14, 2021
Vanessa Baudin Sanchez, Aminata Camara Badji
En Français, Program

DG met en œuvre des projets dans les pays francophones d’Afrique et des Caraïbes depuis 2007. Nous mettons notre expertise technique au profit de nos partenaires à travers des outils capables de soutenir les processus et de permettre des analyses personnalisées pour de meilleurs résultats dans plusieurs secteurs, notamment l’assistance  au développement, l’agriculture, les industries extractives et la santé. Ce bulletin d’informations présente le travail récent ou en cours de DG dans les pays francophones.

Assistance au développement

AMP République Démoctactique du Congo (RDC)

Dans le cadre de la redynamisation du processus PGA en RDC, nous avons mis à jour et déployé  la nouvelle version du logiciel de la plateforme de gestion de l’aide (PGAI 3.4.1.). D’autres fonctionnalités ont été activées pour améliorer la qualité des données PGA, y compris : 

  • La fiche d’évaluation des partenaires – un module qui évalue la réactivité des partenaires à fournir leurs données en réponse aux requêtes du Gouvernement;
  • Le gestionnaire de couches SIG – une fonctionnalité qui permet d’ajouter les informations sous forme de couches superposées sur la carte pour des analyses fines;
  • D’autres fonctions pour contribuer à faire de la PGAI  un outil susceptible d’éclairer  la prise de décision en RDC.

Cette mise à jour s’est étendue à l’outil IATI et au portail public, qui publie les informations sur les projets et programmes de développement. L’outil IATI de nos PGA peut être utilisé pour extraire les informations sur les activités de développement à partir du registre prévu à cet effet, disponible en ligne. Les informations utiles incluent le montant des engagements et des décaissements, les agences d’exécution, les secteurs d’intervention etc. Nous avons également activé le module PGA Hors-Ligne pour pallier les défis en matière de connectivité Internet auxquels sont confrontés nos partenaires en RDC. L’équipe technique de DG travaille en parallèle sur un tableau de bord personnalisé qui permettra de suivre les progrès vers les indicateurs du New Deal (NDD) et la nouvelle stratégie de développement national (PNSD) de 2019, ainsi que les Objectifs de Développement Durable (ODD). Le nouveau tableau de bord sera intégré au site web du ministère du plan.

PGA Tchad

Le Tchad a été le second pays en Afrique Francophone à vouloir redynamiser leur processus PGA après trois années d’inactivité, même si la Direction de la Planification a continué à recueillir certaines données des projets de développement dans un classeur Excel. Le travail de l’équipe de DG a commencé par un nettoyage préliminaire de la base de données qui a permis d’archiver plus de 200 projets clôturés. DG a également actualisé les programmes PGA avant d’entamer les travaux techniques préliminaires, notamment ceux liés à leur base de données par rapport à la dernière version disponible du logiciel PGA (3.x). La nouvelle version de la PGA a été installée en novembre 2020 et des formations sur l’outil sont prévues dans le cadre du volet de renforcement de capacités du programme PGA. Sur la base des enseignements tirés de la mise en œuvre initiale de la PGA, le ministre de l’économie et de la planification du développement a invité les donateurs et les autres parties prenantes à contribuer à la plateforme pour en faire la référence pour toutes les informations relatives à l’assistance au développement. Ce leadership politique fort constitue une incitation à maintenir et à utiliser la plateforme sur le long terme.

Tableau de bord de la coopération Sud-Sud (CSD) en Haïti

DG a établi un partenariat avec le Centre de Données sur la Politique de Développement et l’USAID, par le biais du Higher Education Solutions Network (HESN), pour aider Haïti à mieux tirer parti des avantages de sa plateforme de gestion de l’aide (MGAE). L’objectif est d’accroître l’utilisation des données par les ministères et les partenaires au développement en incorporant la gestion de la coopération Sud-Sud. En effet, l’aide au développement traditionnelle tend à se concentrer sur le financement et les chiffres, tandis que la coopération Sud-Sud est plus souvent sous forme de soutien en nature, y compris l’assistance technique, qui peut être difficile à quantifier.  DG développe actuellement un tableau de bord de la Coopération Sud Sud (CSS) intégré au MGAE pour mettre en évidence et visualiser les formes d’assistance technique des partenaires du Sud (ALC, Afrique et Asie) qui contribuent au développement d’Haïti. 

Tableau de bord de la coopération Sud-Sud (CSD) en Haïti

Agriculture

Le programme de décisions administratives fondées sur des données (AD3) au Sénégal 

Le programme AD3 travaille avec le gouvernement et la société civile pour co-créer de nouvelles stratégies visant à maximiser l’utilisation des données administratives. Financé par la Fondation William & Flora Hewlett, AD3 vise à répondre aux principaux défis de l’utilisation efficace des données administratives dans le secteur de l’agriculture. 

Le programme comporte deux volets spécifiques :

Le programme comporte deux volets spécifiques :

La Plateforme AGRIDATA : Exploiter le pouvoir des statistiques agricoles 

DG s’est associé à l’Initiative Prospective Agricole et Rurale (IPAR) dans le cadre de son programme avec l’Agence Nationale de la Statistique et de la Démographie (ANSD) visant à exploiter le pouvoir des statistiques agricoles pour promouvoir des stratégies axées sur le développement durable du secteur agricole. La plateforme analytique intègre des ensembles de données de haute qualité sur la chaîne de valeur agricole (production, consommation, marché), des indicateurs de développement internationaux et nationaux et des microdonnées.

Le Portail pour le suivi de la campagne agricole au Sénégal

DG collabore avec le groupe de travail Pluridisciplinaire (GTP), un forum coordonné par l’Autorité Nationale de l’Aviation Civile et de la Météorologie (ANACIM) qui vise à informer et à guider le développement de systèmes d’alerte précoce pour la sécurité alimentaire au Sénégal. DG développera un tableau de bord qui donnera accès à un ensemble de visuels et de ressources pour faciliter l’utilisation des informations sur l’agriculture, la météorologie, les besoins en eau des cultures, l’hydrologie, la situation phytosanitaire, le pastoralisme et la végétation. Le tableau de bord sera officiellement lancé durant le premier trimestre 2021.

Industries extractives

Indice pilote des femmes dans l’industrie minière (WIM) en Guinée

DG, en partenariat avec WIM Guinée, et avec le soutien d’OSIWA Guinée, a conçu l’index pilote WIM Guinée, un outil de visualisation en ligne, basé sur des indicateurs et des variables nationaux, notamment le rôle du gouvernement dans la promotion de l’égalité des sexes, l’implication des compagnies minières, le rôle des OSC dans la défense des intérêts, l’autonomisation des femmes, l’impact des activités extractives sur la santé des communautés, en particulier des femmes. L’indice pilote WIM Guinée a été conçu pour mesurer l’inclusion des femmes dans le secteur minier guinéen, aider à comprendre les obstacles rencontrés dans les environnements d’entreprise et les communautés, et mesurer l’exposition des femmes aux dangers des activités minières.

l'index pilote WIM Guinée

Santé 

Projet de centre ouvert de données géospatiales (OpenDCH) en Côte d’Ivoire

Le Centre de Données pour la Politique de Développement et  DG AidData se sont associés à l’USAID/Côte d’Ivoire pour construire un centre de données géospatiales ouvert/GeoCenter for Health comme centre de collaboration. Ce projet, axé sur le VIH/sida, visait à faire progresser l’analyse de la localisation des communautés touchées, en se concentrant sur les zones où les lacunes en matière de dépistage et de traitement du VIH sont les plus importantes. En plus de l’outil développé, le projet a équipé le niveau national et 39 districts sanitaires de matériel informatique (41 écrans, 94 ordinateurs portables, 46 imprimantes, 86 GPS, 85 smartphones et 186 wifi pocket) et a également rénové et équipé une salle serveurs. Le projet OpenDCH s’est achevé en juillet 2020.

Le projet OpenDCH

Des Chiffes et Des Jeunes (DCDJ) en Côte d’Ivoire

DCDJ est un programme dirigé par Development Gateway et financé par le programme MCC-PEPFAR Data Collaboratives for Local Impact (DCLI). Le programme vise à améliorer l’écosystème des données en Côte d’Ivoire, à augmenter l’offre et la demande de données – en particulier les données sur la santé – et à former et soutenir les utilisateurs de données.  L’une des composantes du programme, les Data Fellows, a formé de jeunes Ivoiriens à la science des données et les a ensuite placés en stage au sein d’organisations pour soutenir leur lutte contre le VIH/SIDA. L’une des fellow, Murielle, a travaillé avec les départements de suivi et d’évaluation et de soins et de traitement du Plan national de la lutte contre le SIDA/VIH (PNLS) et a constaté des incohérences dans les données communiquées par les cliniques et les pharmacies. Dans le cadre de sa recherche, elle s’est rendue sur les sites de déclaration, et a vu que les travailleurs n’étaient pas correctement formés – et qu’ils communiquaient par conséquent des données erronées. Murielle a ensuite formé les travailleurs des sites au contrôle qualité et à l’élaboration de rapports.  Elle a déclaré : “Si les données au bas de l’échelle sont fragmentées, cela aura un impact sur les résultats au sommet”.

Bonne lecture !

Rapport final : Évaluations du portail de données sur les industries extractives

DG a mené des évaluations,  à partir de juin 2018, sur le paysage des données des industries extractives au Sénégal, au Nigeria et en Guinée afin de déterminer la faisabilité et la pertinence d’y installer  des portail de données ouvertes sur les industries extractives (PDEI). Ces rapports détaillent les constats, les besoins exprimés des différents acteurs et les recommandations de DG pour des données plus ouvertes.

Etude de faisabilité de la mise en place de Portails Nationaux de Données sur les Industries Extractives →

Rapport final : Indice pilote des femmes dans l’industrie minière en Guinée

Rapport final suite à l’évaluation de DG et à l’élaboration de l’index pilote de WIM-Guinée pour les femmes dans les mines. L’indice a été conçu pour comprendre les obstacles réels qui entravent l’implication et l’autonomisation des femmes dans le secteur minier en Guinée.

Rapport Final Indice Pilote Women in Mining Guinée →

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Les Points Forts

Échos du secteur de la noix de cajou – André M. Tandjiekpon

André M. Tandjiekpon, Secrétaire exécutif du Conseil international consultatif du cajou (CICC), donne un aperçu du travail du CICC et explique comment la plateforme Cashew-IN développée par DG contribuera à son travail.

June 15, 2022 Agriculture
Joseph Zerbo
Échos du secteur de la noix de cajou – Joseph Zerbo

Joseph Zerbo, conseiller aux affaires économiques directeur général du Conseil burkinabé du cajou (CBA), dresse un panorama de la filière cajou au Burkina Faso.

May 25, 2022 Agriculture
Roland Oroh
Échos du secteur de la noix de cajou – Roland Oroh

Roland Oroh, Président du Comité de pilotage national du Nigéria, donne un aperçu du secteur du cajou au Nigeria et explique comment la plateforme Cashew-IN développée par CNFA et DG soutiendra son travail.

May 19, 2022 Agriculture

Highlights from Francophone Africa and the Caribbean

January 14, 2021
Vanessa Baudin Sanchez, Aminata Camara Badji
Program

DG has been implementing projects in French-speaking African and Caribbean countries since 2007. We apply our technical expertise to develop multilingual customized tools, processes, and analyses to help our partners achieve results in various domains including development assistance, agriculture, extractive industries, and health. This newsletter highlights DG’s ongoing work in francophone countries. 

Development Assistance

AMP Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)

We successfully upgraded and deployed the new version of the Aid Management Platform (AMP) software (3.4.1.), which includes functionalities to significantly improve data quality such as:

  • The Donor Score Card – a module aimed at evaluating donors timeliness in disclosing their development assistance data
  • The GIS Layer Manager – a functionality that adds indicator information on the map
  • Other functions for making AMP a powerful tool for decision-making purposes. 

Additionally, we deployed the IATI tool and Public Portal, which will allow countries to publish their development assistance information. The IATI tool can be used to retrieve and download development projects directly from the registry including, commitment and disbursement amounts, executing agencies they work with, etc. We also activated the AMP Offline module as DRC has continuously been facing challenges with Internet connectivity. DG’s tech team is working in parallel on a customized dashboard that will monitor and track progress towards the New Deal Indicators (NDD) and the new 2019 National Development Strategy (PNSD) as well as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). The completed NDD/PNSD Dashboard will be integrated to the Ministry of Planning Website.

AMP Chad

Chad is the second country that expressed the need to revive their AMP process after three years of inactivity even if they have been collecting project data via an Excel workbook. The DG team started by cleaning up the current database, archiving more than 200 projects that have been completed. DG also added the new national strategy before starting the preliminary tech work on this project, namely, applying the new AMP software version (3.x) to their database.  The updated version was deployed on the production server in November 2020. Several training sessions have been planned in the upcoming weeks as part of the capacity building effort of our AMP program. Working toward sustainability and building on our lessons learned from the initial AMP implementation, the Minister of Economy and Development Planning has invited donors and other stakeholders to contribute to the platform with the intention of making it the go-to source for all information related to development assistance. This strong political leadership provides an incentive to maintain and use the platform in the long term.

Haiti South-South Cooperation (SSC) Dashboard

DG partnered with the AidData Center for Development Policy and USAID, through the Higher Education Solutions Network (HESN), to support Haiti in building upon its existing Aid Management Platform (MGAE). The goal is to increase data use among government ministries and development partners. Traditional development assistance tends to focus on financing and figures, while South-South Cooperation is more often in-kind support, including technical assistance, which can be difficult to accurately capture in numbers. DG is currently developing an SSC dashboard within the MGAE to highlight and visualize forms of technical assistance from partners in the Global South (LAC, Africa, and Asia) who contribute to Haiti’s development. 

Haiti South-South Cooperation (SSC) Dashboard

Agriculture

The Administrative Data-Driven Decisions (AD3) Program in Senegal 

The AD3 program is working with the government and CSO to co-create new strategies for maximizing the use of administrative data. Funded by the William & Flora Hewlett Foundation, AD3 aims to respond to key challenges to effective administrative data use in the Agriculture sector. The program has two specific components.

AD3 Senegal Portals

The AGRIDATA Platform: Unleashes the power of agricultural statistics, empowering stakeholders to monitor the agricultural season in Senegal. For this platform, DG is partnering with the Agricultural and Rural Perspective Initiative (Initiative Prospective Agricole et Rurale) in Senegal, with the National Agency of Statistics and Demography (Agence Nationale de la Statistique et de la Démographie). The analytical platform integrates high-quality datasets on the agricultural value chain (production, consumption, market) international and national development indicators and microdata.

Agricultural Season Monitoring Platform: DG is collaborating with the Multi-disciplinary Working Group (GTP), a forum coordinated by the National Civil Aviation and Meteorology Authority that aims to inform and guide the development of early warning systems for food security. The dashboard will give access to a set of visuals and resources to facilitate the use of information on agriculture, meteorology, crop water needs, hydrology, phytosanitary situation, pastoralism, and vegetation. The dashboard will be officially launched by the end of 2020.

Extractives Industry

Women In Mining (WIM) Guinea Pilot Index

DG, in partnership with WIM Guinea, and with the support of OSIWA Guinea,  designed the WIM Guinea Pilot Index,  an online visualization tool, based on national indicators and variables including, the role of the government in promoting gender equity, the involvement of mining companies, the role of CSOs in advocacy, women’s empowerment, the impact of extractive activities on the health of communities, especially women. The WIM Guinea Pilot Index was designed to measure women’s inclusion in the Guinean mining sector, help understand the barriers faced in corporate environments and communities, and measure women’s exposure to the dangers of mining activities.

Women in Mining Pilot Index

Health 

Open Geospatial Data Center Project (OpenDCH) in Côte d’Ivoire

The AidData Center for Development Policy and DG partnered with USAID/Cote d’Ivoire to build an open geospatial data center/GeoCenter for Health as a hub of collaboration. This project focused on HIV/Aids and aimed to advance analysis on where affected communities are located, focusing on areas with greater gaps for HIV testing and treatment. In addition to the tool developed the project equipped the national level and 39 health districts with IT equipment (41 screens, 94 laptops, 46 printers, 86 GPS, 85 smartphones, and 186 mobile internet units) and also renovated and equipped a server room. The OpenDCH project was completed in July 2020.

OpenDCH Dashboard

Des Chiffes et Des Jeunes (DCDJ) in Côte d’ivoire

Des Chiffres et Des Jeunes (DCDJ) is a program led by Development Gateway and funded by the MCC-PEPFAR Data Collaboratives for Local Impact (DCLI) Program. The program aims to improve the data ecosystem in Côte d’Ivoire, increase the supply and demand for data – particularly health data – and to train and support data users.  One component of the program, the Data Fellows, trained young Ivorians in data science and then placed them in internships supporting organizations fighting HIV/AIDS. One of the fellows, Murielle,  worked with both the M&E and the Care and Treatment Departments of the National AIDS Control Program (Plan National de la Lutte Contre le SIDA/VIH, PNLS). She saw inaccuracies in the data reported by clinics and pharmacies and visited the reporting sites, and learned that workers were not properly trained – and were reporting poor data as a result. Murielle then trained workers at the sites on quality control and reporting.  She said, “If the data at the bottom of the ladder is broken, it will impact the results at the top.”

Happy Reading!

Final Report: Extractives Industry Data Portal Assessments

Starting in June 2018, DG assessed the extractive data landscape in Senegal, Nigeria, and Guinea to determine the feasibility of developing an Extractives Industry Data Portal (EIDP) for each country. These reports detail the findings, the actors expressed needs, and recommendations.

Read the EIDP Assessment Report →

Final Report: Women in Mining Guinea Pilot Index

The final report following DG’s assessment and pilot index for Women in Mining Guinea. The index was designed to capture the real obstacles hindering women’s involvement and empowerment in the mining sector. 

Read the WIM Guinea Report →

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Making South-South Cooperation Personal: A Learning Exchange Between Haiti and Côte d’Ivoire // Titre : Pour une coopération Sud-Sud personnalisée : Un échange de connaissances entre Haïti et la Côte d’Ivoire

“Knowledge sharing” is an undeniable buzzword in the international development space. However, the idea behind it is both simple and effective: by sharing similar experiences and learning from one another, teams can develop practical solutions to challenges. Often, they also discover their challenges are not unique – across DG’s global Aid Management Platform (AMP) network, our experience highlights how AMP country challenges and goals are often aligned.

July 24, 2019 Aid Management Program

DCDJ at Devex World

December 16, 2020 DCDJ Development Gateway
News/Events

Last Thursday, the DCDJ Fellows attended Devex World. This was a great opportunity for these young professionals to learn more about putting their data science skills to use.

Screenshot from Devex World

Screenshot from the Data Revolution session at Devex World

Des Chiffres et Des Jeunes (DCDJ) is a program led by Development Gateway and funded by the MCC-PEPFAR Data Collaboratives for Local Impact (DCLI) Program in Côte d’Ivoire. DCDJ aims to bolster the subnational supply and use of data for Ivorian citizens, engage youth as champions of these services, and fuel innovation to address rising data needs. A DCDJ Fellowship provides dual benefits for both Ivorian host organizations and Data Fellows themselves.

As the final cohort of DCDJ Fellows is finishing the work at their placement sites, many are looking for new opportunities to grow professionally. Attending Devex World through DCDJ provided a platform for professional networking, exploring new ideas, and seeing how their data science work fits with the broader development community.

22 Fellows attended all or part of the event, along with French translator Cedric Doffou. Each of the Fellows found value in each of the different sessions, and nearly half of the Fellows said they would use information learned in the Data Revolution session in the future. Specifically, Data Fellows gravitated to the Data Revolution session because of its focus on balancing data skills, data openness, and data sharing. Additionally, Devex Backstage and the Meet & Greet/networking sessions were noted by many Fellows as useful to their careers.

As we near the closing months of the DCDJ program, and work to transfer the project to its future more sustainable parent organization, we will continue to look for opportunities to support the Fellows as their careers grow.